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Glossary
    in Terms
    in Terms & Definitions
 
Flame retardant:
a substance added or a treatment applied to a material in order to suppress, significantly reduce or delay the propagation of flame.
Last referenced in: Product developments and innovations in the home textiles market, April 2014 (Textile Outlook International Issue 168)

Flammé:
a slub yarn.
Last referenced in: Survey of the European yarn fairs for autumn/winter 2014/15 (Textile Outlook International Issue 165)

Flannel:
generally, a cotton or wool fabric, which has been napped on one or both sides (usually both) followed by a bleaching, dyeing or printing process and then brushed or rerun through the napping machine to revive the nap. Flannel fabrics are perceived
Last referenced in: Survey of the European Fabric Fairs for Autumn/Winter 2012/13 (Textile Outlook International Issue 154)

Flannelette:
a woven cotton fabric with a soft, raised surface.

Flared leg:
a style of jeans which are tightly fitted around the hips and thighs of a person but become much wider from the knees downwards.

Flash spunbonding:
a major variant of spunbonding, developed by DuPont, where polypropylene is solvent-dissolved and then pumped through holes into a chamber. The solvent is then flashed off, and highly oriented filaments are produced.

Flash-spun:
a type of web made by flash spunbonding.

Flax:
the fibre used to make linen textiles.
Last referenced in: Trends in US textile and clothing imports, April 2014 (Textile Outlook International Issue 168)

Fleece (garment):
outerwear jacket made from fleece fabric.

Fleece fabric:
a fabric, usually knitted, with a heavy napped surface on one side. The fabric is produced using two types of yarn, one for the face area and the other for the reverse. After fabric formation and processing, the reverse area is brushed to produce the fleece effect. The inside surface of a sweatshirt is usually napped. Pile or napped fabric with a deep, soft, woolly-style surface.
Last referenced in: Global apparel markets: business update, 1st quarter 2013 (Global Apparel Markets Issue 21)

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